Sister Celluloid

Where old movies go to live

Category Archives: Photo Gallery: They Had Faces Then

From Laurel & Hardy to James Dean and Beyond: A Love Letter to George Stevens

You know how with some people, you say “I love their work!” but really, let’s face it, you’re actually in love with them? That’s me with George Stevens. Today is his birthday, and yet it’s not even a national holiday. That’s just wrong. But we’re celebrating here at Sister Celluloid, sharing behind-the-scenes glimpses of the man at work. (And at …

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TINTYPE TUESDAY: HOLLYWOOD CELEBRATES THE HOLIDAYS Hits the Bookshelves!

Welcome to another edition of TINTYPE TUESDAY! Still searching for that last-minute gift for a classic movie fan? Or maybe you’ve run your tootsies ragged and you deserve a little something yourself? Look no further than the gorgeous new book, Hollywood Celebrates the Holidays: 1920-1970! Lovingly written and researched by film historians Karie Bible and Mary Mallory, …

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TINTYPE TUESDAY: A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE Debuts on Broadway

Welcome to another edition of TINTYPE TUESDAY! Four years before it made its way into celluloid history, A Streetcar Named Desire opened on Broadway 68 years ago this week, on December 3, 1947. Three of the four principals—Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter and Karl Malden—followed the play to Hollywood, but Jessica Tandy lost the role of Blanche DuBois to …

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TINTYPE TUESDAY: The Cuddly Side of Boris Karloff

Welcome to another edition of TINTYPE TUESDAY, bringing you wonderful movie photos every week! Shooting the terrifying lake scene in Frankenstein was going to be emotionally fraught enough. But before filming even began, director James Whale faced another problem: Boris Karloff’s makeup required hours to apply, so he needed to be fully “monsterized” by the time …

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TINTYPE TUESDAY: Bette Davis’s Unrequited Love Affair—With Dogs

Welcome to another edition of TINTYPE TUESDAY! In December 1930, Bette Davis stepped off the Twentieth Century Limited and swanned into Union Station all set to conquer Hollywood, with her mother by her side and her wire-haired terrier, Boojum, in her arms. A rep from Warner Bros. was supposed to meet the happy trio, but no …

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Four Extraordinary Heroes, One Regiment: Basil Rathbone, Ronald Colman, Claude Rains and Herbert Marshall in World War I

Basil Rathbone conceived an almost certain suicide mission—and carried it off disguised as a tree. Herbert Marshall, who lost a leg to a sniper’s bullet, downplayed his sacrifice, saying his most salient memories of the trenches were numbness and boredom. Claude Rains lost almost half his sight to a poison gas attack. And Ronald Colman …

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TINTYPE TUESDAY: Keaton, Valentino and Nazimova, Ready for Their Arthur Rice Close-Ups

Welcome to another edition of TINTYPE TUESDAY! When you think of classic-film portraits, who pops to mind? George Hurrell, Clarence Bull, Ruth Harriett Louise? What about Arthur Rice? When it comes to recognition, Rice seems to have been left largely on the cutting-room floor. But his work was nothing short of stunning, capturing in still life …

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TINTYPE TUESDAY: Bette Davis Invites You (and Half of Classic Hollywood!) to the Tailwaggers Ball!

Welcome to another edition of TINTYPE TUESDAY! Put on your party clothes and pile in the car, kids—we’re goin’ to a ball! Bette Davis, who famously doted on her own dogs, was also the Lifetime President of the Tailwaggers Society of Southern California. And in the summer of 1938, she threw a fundraiser at the Beverly Hills Hotel …

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TINTYPE TUESDAY: At Home (and on the Floor) with Montgomery Clift!

Welcome to another edition of TINTYPE TUESDAY! This week: a slightly early 95th-birthday tribute to Montgomery Clift. Before Stanley Kubrick began telling stories with moving pictures, he told them with still-lifes, as a $50-a-week photojournalist for Look magazine in the mid to late 1940s. Some of his early photo essays were staged (I know—you’re shocked!), but as he …

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Remembering James Dean 60 Years On—And Busting Some Myths Along the Way

Sixty years ago today, a wildly gifted young actor was killed. And a one-dimensional legend was born. The brooding rebel in the leather jacket. Which summed up about one half of one percent of who James Dean was either as an actor or a person. Those who knew him, loved him and worked with him …

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The Diabolical Blog Of Joe DeVito

Laugh at the serious stuff + stare blankly at the jokes

MovieMovieBlogBlog II

A continuation of moviemovieblogblog.wordpress.com...More of my thoughts on movies and pop culture

ladysilky

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Eddie Selover

The Art of Communications

supervistaramacolorscope

Movie & TV stuff by Mel Neuhaus

Ephemeral New York

Chronicling an ever-changing city through faded and forgotten artifacts

The Old Hollywood Garden

Come take a walk with me in Old Hollywood. There's so much to talk about!

"fate keeps on happening"

"Going to the fortune teller's was just as good as going to the opera, and the cost scarcely a trifle more - ergo, I will disguise myself and go again, one of these days, when other amusements fail." - Mark Twain, Letter to Orion Clemens, February 6, 1861

Making a Cinephile

All things film-related.

cracked rear viewer

Fresh takes on retro pop culture

cinemaclaco

über Film und Kinos in Leipzig

OldMoviesaregreat

Old Movies are best

The Film Noir Guy

Film noir off the beaten path

Well, Here's Another Nice Mess . . .

Random, Rambling, Ruminations . . .

Etcetera

Thoughts from my perfectly-wrecked brain

Making A Way

Fighting for my right to party

SCENTS MEMORY

Wear what you love, not what they say you should like.