Sister Celluloid

Where old movies go to live

Category Archives: Festivals/Events

Could an Audrey Hepburn Blogathon Get Any More Fabulous? Yes—We’ve Added Prizes!

O wind, if winter comes, can spring be far behind? I can’t swear to it, but I’m pretty sure Shelley was talking about Audrey Hepburn’s birthday. We’ll be celebrating in a big way here at Sister Celluloid— and giving away prizes! On May 4, Audrey would have turned 90—and we’re hoping to capture every aspect …

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In THE MIRACLE WOMAN, All Eyes Are on Stanwyck—Especially Capra’s

There’s a certain luminous quality that shines through when a director is in love with his leading lady. In Frank Capra’s The Miracle  Woman, starring Barbara Stanwyck, it’s all over the screen. This was the second film for these kindred spirits—whose relationship got off to such a rocky start, the real miracle is that they ended up working together at all. In 1930, …

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The Ever-Infuriating Oscar Memorial Reel: Who Got Snubbed In 2019?

I used to slog through the bloated Oscar show every year just to see the honorary awards for Lifetime Achievement, which were grudgingly doled out to classic stars and directors the Academy had criminally ignored throughout their careers. But then a few years ago, they banished them to a smaller event that’s not even televised. …

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Announcing Audrey at 90: The Salute to Audrey Hepburn Blogathon!

O wind, if winter comes, can spring be far behind? I can’t swear to it, but I’m pretty sure Shelley was talking about Audrey Hepburn’s birthday. Which we’ll be celebrating in a big way here at Sister Celluloid! On May 4, Audrey would have turned 90—and we’re hoping to capture every aspect of her remarkable …

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The Theater’s Alive with THE SOUND OF MUSIC! TCM Brings It Back This Month

If The Sound of Music is one of your favorite things, you’re in luck: On September 9 and 12, TCM and Fathom Events return the gloriously restored musical to the big screen. Back in March 2015, when the new print kicked off the TCM Classic Film Festival, Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer—who still clearly adore each …

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The Oscar In Memoriam Reel: Who Got Snubbed This Year?

Another year, another botched attempt by the Academy to honor its own. For a lot of movie lovers—classic-film fans especially—Oscar’s memorial-reel slights have become a cringe-inducing annual tradition. I don’t know if Bette Davis really did name the statuette Oscar because his backside resembled her husband’s. But when it comes to honoring those who’ve given …

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FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN! The Cast and Creator Open Up at a Sneak Preview of the Finale

While we were falling in love with Jessica Lange, she was falling in love with Joan Crawford. “She was such a treasure,” said Lange at a Q&A hosted by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, following a sneak preview of the Feud: Bette and Joan finale. “She was never given the credit she was due. And …

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MoMA Presents “Leo McCarey: Seriously Funny,” Covering the Undersung Director from the Silents Onward

“I only know I like my characters to walk in clouds, I like a little bit of the fairy tale. As long as I’m there behind the camera lens, I’ll let somebody else photograph the ugliness of the world.” —Leo McCarey If you’re anywhere near New York this month, prepare to walk in the clouds. …

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THE NITRATE PICTURE SHOW: When the Screen Glistened with Real Silver

There’s a reason they call it the Silver Screen. In the early days, reels of nitrate film contained actual silver. Most of these precious spools were melted down by studios for their metal content or neglected until they turned to dust, liquefied or burned in warehouse fires. But not all are lost—and earlier this month, the passionate film-preservation …

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When Richard Widmark Hugs You, You Stay Hugged

Back in the spring of 2001, the Walter Reade Theatre had a retrospective of Richard Widmark films, with a special—to put it mildly—appearance by the man himself, who was then 86. I had loved Richard Widmark since I was a kid, when I saw him in Don’t Bother to Knock. He seemed like a bit of a …

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